You are much stronger than you know

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A few weeks ago I posted a new short form video to Two Sides of FI, the YouTube channel I produce with my show partner, Eric. These videos are often highlight clips taken from our full-length videos which we share between episodes. This one was a little different. In that video I talked about the idea of spontaneity, something I thought a lot about during a 13-mile walk* I took the day prior. I’m not going to rehash the content of that video, as I think that’s covered well there. I hope you agree. Rather, I’d like to write about the walk itself.

What I didn’t state in the video is that walk was the second-longest I’d done in my life. In fact, the longest was a 14-mile hike in Utah that my wife, Lorri and I did nearly twenty years ago in 2003, when I was in the best shape of my adult life. We basically lived inside the boundaries of Acadia National Park at that time, didn’t yet have a child, and hiked often. So even though 14 miles is a long hike no matter what, it wasn’t too much of a struggle as I recall. This picture seems to support that, as we don’t seem what I would characterize as miserable.

Me and my wife smiling next to the sign at the end of the trail after completing our hike
2003 (Utah): Happy at the end of our fourteen-mile hike

Time for a new challenge

Fast forward to now: I’m closing in on 50 years old faster than I’d prefer, am certainly heavier vs. 2003 though thankfully otherwise in excellent health, and while I still walk and hike at least five days a week, most of my excursions are around three miles long with occasional hikes of 4-6 miles. I’m still good to go on trails marked as Moderate intensity, but a longer Strenuous graded hike on a hot day will definitely kick my ass. But I can get it done. But it’s certainly been a very long time since I hiked more than 7-8 miles in one go.

So honestly, for me it was kind of a big deal that last month with almost no advance thought, I decided to walk out my door and not stop for more than 13 miles until I arrived two towns down the road at my targeted lunchtime stop. The reason I gave Lorri for undertaking this endeavor was my interest in doing some backpacking, and needing to see what my endurance was like these days. But if I’m being honest, the main reason I undertook that challenge was simply to see if I could do it. It turned out that I could!

I was really happy with that achievement, which was the equivalent of walking a half-marathon. But I knew I was capable of more. I hadn’t fallen apart after more than 13 miles of walking and honestly didn’t feel too bad the next day either. So yesterday I decided I had more tests I wanted to take on. My family was going to be busy with other things, so the timing was great. After considering a few route options, I set out to walk to a grocery store in the next town. Taking a longer route on back roads through vineyards and ranches, it would be about ten miles to get there. Depending on how I felt at that point, I’d either take a more direct route home for 17.5 miles total, or what I really wanted to do: reverse my earlier route for a total of 20 miles.

Raising the bar + going for it

Completing either option would have been a huge achievement for me, and the longest hike/walk I’d ever done at either 25% or 43% longer compared with the Utah hike I described above. The first ten miles went fine and then I grabbed a quick lunch. After sitting for 20 minutes to rest and eat, I set out again. After a little deliberation, I decided I just had to go for 20 miles. What was the risk? Even if I couldn’t make it back I could always call for a ride. I felt pretty confident that I could make it though. If I’m being honest, I kinda knew it, and would regret choosing the shorter walk home had I done it.

That confidence aside, I was pleasantly surprised how well it went. Yes, my split times got a lot worse in the back half of the walk. My usual ~19-20 min walking pace slowed quite a bit to yield the average shown above. It was a hot day, and my hips, feet, and legs were definitely tired. Listening to music helped, particularly some more aggressive industrial + metal for when I started dragging. So I soldiered on, drinking water from my trusty CamelBak all the while, and got through it. I took a pit stop before the last two miles and grabbed a cold drink at a store, as the now-tepid water I was carrying wasn’t gonna get me to my goal. Once I got back to my neighborhood I did an extra lap around the block to ensure I hit my target: 20 miles. I had done it!

My daughter was really surprised (and sounded a bit concerned) when I told her how long I’d walked. Teens aren’t great at measuring the passage of time so I’m not sure she realized I had been gone for eight hours and walking for nearly all of that. My response to her amazement was pretty simple: “You are stronger than you realize.” I’ve always believed that’s true, though I’ve not often considered athletic achievements when saying that to myself. I was, after all, one of the kids always picked last for teams in gym class. Always. So choosing something so sporty to test myself with was kind of a big deal.

I think it’s important to remind ourselves of just how much we are capable, and that’s the core lesson I took from this experience. Perhaps we don’t always need such tests to do that, but they can be a pretty helpful tool to prove it to our ever-doubting brains. I do know that until recently, I wouldn’t have conceived of taking this on, nor made the time to do it if the idea had crossed my mind. “Giving up” a whole day for a walk like this is certainly a good example of the power that time freedom really offers, and why I consider this the greatest benefit of my early “retirement”.

What tests have you intentionally or by circumstance undertaken, proving to yourself just how strong you are? I suspect anyone reading this has great examples of the same. You are all stronger than you may know. I wish you all the best.


*when all my time moving is spent on paved or unpaved roads or on the shoulders of the same, I term these excursions as “walks” – no matter how rural they might be. This is in contrast to hikes, which for me indicates that I’m traveling on trails, navigating irregular terrain, etc. In the end they can both have lots of elevation change and range from Easy to Strenuous grade, and are definitely both exercise, but I choose to differentiate the way I use the terms. 🤷‍♂️

6 Replies to “You are much stronger than you know”

    1. Thanks, Fritz! And you should feel pretty good! I hope you had a blast on the AT. I highly recommend hiking the other end of the trail someday if you haven’t in the past. Baxter is such a beautiful area and there are a number of good options to hike Mt. Katahdin.

  1. Walking and running more is absolutely one of my goals for semi-, and eventually full, retirement. I’m 50 this year, and on the cusp of moving from a corporate career to a 3-day week doing coaching work. My wife and I already spend many of our weekends and days off taking leisurely hikes in the countryside, and in the past 2-3 years have started running marathons and ultramarathons. We’re not trying to compete with the guys and girls at the front, but spending 5-7 hours together achieving something challenging is fantastic, and the associated endorphins have further strengthened our relationship. Keep challenging yourself and, if you can, encourage Lorri to join you sometimes.

    1. Thanks for sharing, Alastair. Sounds like you’ve got a great plan. Best wishes to you on your career transition and in all things.

  2. Fantastic share, Jason! Your adventure has my mind exploring similar spontaneous activities for myself. What did you enjoy the most about the walk – the physical accomplishment, time in nature, mental reflection time, spontaneous freedom to do the walk? I suspect a little of each added to your enjoyment and satisfaction. Your posts are always enjoyable to read, and I especially enjoy your Two Sides of FI podcasts with Eric. I’m a few years older than both of you, but I am in a very similar stage (although 6-8 years out from retirement, FI may arrive in 3-4 years). You both are very genuine, sincere, and transparent, and your content provides many talking points between my wife and I. Much appreciated!

    1. Thanks, Grant! On this walk I think it was first the accomplishment and then the sheer freedom to be able to take a whole day to do such a thing. But you’re definitely right about it being all of the above! I really appreciate your feedback, particularly today where I’m feeling a bit down about something else. I truly value the input I get from those who follow my blog or our YouTube channel, and even more so when they share their precious time to respond. Your support means a ton to me!

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