Content creation: my surprise glidepath into early retirement

My good friend and Two Sides of FI show partner, Eric and I recently had the honor of being interviewed by a well known FIRE community member – Jordan “Doc G” Grumet. The image at the bottom of this post links to that episode of the Earn and Invest podcast. It was a great conversation and I hope you check it out. Having the chance to speak with Jordan was a really positive experience for me in a variety of ways. First, it was a privilege to work with a great interviewer and respected member of this community, and have a really enjoyable conversation with him and Eric. Second, it felt like a kind of acknowledgement that our little project had reached another stage in its evolution. This chat represents the first time that we were the guest on someone else’s platform as Two Sides of FI, and I’m excited for the exposure that this could bring to our little show. Lastly, the experience caused me to reflect on a number of key topics. And one of those seemed an important theme to write about.

Transitions can be challenging

One concept that has come up numerous times on the YouTube channel is the idea of glidepaths into retirement. Often in the FIRE community these relate to finances, like certain asset allocation strategies. But what’s perhaps even more important, are those that have nothing to do with money. Retirement, whether early or traditional, is a huge change for anyone. Irrespective of how long your career was and how happy you were in those jobs, ceasing to do the thing you spent the majority of your waking hours doing for nearly the entirety of your adult life up until that point is a big transition. Even if retirement is something you looked forward to and planned for years, it’s a substantial and often rather abrupt course change. It’s even harder for someone who unexpectedly had to retire.

As I’ve talked about here before, the timing of my own transition could perhaps have been better. I stopped working at my former job in June 2020, just a couple of months into the COVID-19 lockdown. That meant that I was spending a lot more time at home, indoors, very much focused on my new life, often alone with my thoughts. I kept busy, throwing myself into many pursuits – learning, exercise, cooking – just to name a few. Six months ago I made an effort to take inventory of all these things. And the list has continued to grow since! But while fulfilling and fun, these undertakings were not what has most helped me process this life change, and the countless emotions that came with it. Rather, it’s been the unintentional glidepath I stumbled into via content creation.

Surprise! You’re a content creator

As I talked about with Jordan, have written about here, and discussed with Eric on the channel, these creative outlets have truly supported my transition into this next chapter of my life. I don’t want you to think that was some kind of super intelligent plan I had from the start. In my very first blog post I acknowledged that I wasn’t even sure why I was writing! The YouTube channel seemed like a fun idea from the very first time we discussed it, and I certainly looked forward to building new skills as part of that journey. But I didn’t realize just how important these endeavors would be to me in more fundamental ways.

It’s interesting to me how these two projects have served related, but differing purposes. This blog turned out to be so much about processing the emotions I was feeling but didn’t yet understand after leaving my career. I can certainly pick up on that when I revisit my earliest posts. Admittedly, the blog has never found a huge audience and I didn’t exactly go out of my way to promote it nor undertake any SEO to lead others to it. So it has largely been a personal, reflective tool – though I truly appreciate all of you who are here with me, reading. But countless times, simply following the wandering path of writing has helped me understand + work through things I’m feeling. Importantly, some posts have caused me to initiate conversations with my family about how I’ve been feeling, and make needed changes. That’s pretty valuable stuff, to say the least.

Two Sides of FI picked up where writing left off, and has expanded in purpose even further. Unquestionably, I’ve always found value in the chats themselves. It’s been so helpful to have open exchange with a trusted friend who I know will speak the candid truth and help me work through questions. I know Eric finds value in our conversations too and it feels great when I feel like I’m able to help in any way. And as we talked about on E+I, it’s been wonderful to have our now 36-year friendship enter a new stage in its evolution. I wouldn’t trade that for anything. But what I couldn’t have foreseen is how truly validating this experience would be. I wrote all about that idea nearly a year ago. Building and working with our channel’s community has been really rewarding. The exchanges I have help me in many ways, and it feels good to know others appreciate + learn from what we create too. It has definitely helped me grow and understand my own journey that much more.

Adding hyphens to your identity

I spent the entirety of my 23-year career and in my training years prior, identifying as a scientist. While the second half of my career was spent primarily out of the lab, or no longer overseeing teams of lab scientists, it always felt like “who I was”. To that, I could have added other words and hypens, like scientist-product manager-service leader-and so on… And of course I’m also a husband, a parent, a son, among other things. However these days, I’ve become much more comfortable with my identity being much more fluid, and frankly, far less important to define so rigidly. I’m no longer merely a scientist, or any of the other labels I used throughout my career. Now I’m a content creator: a writer, podcaster, a YouTuber, an occasional wine educator, and someone who thinks + talks about retirement, personal finance, and the universe of associated topics often.

The last two years have taught me a lot of things. Some of them I come to on my own, while others were born out of conversations had on 2SFI or in the E+I podcast linked here. What I do know is that content creation has most certainly aided my transition into this next phase of my life. I have become increasingly comfortable with the idea of “being retired” from my former career (no matter what “the R word” actually means!) It has not only helped me gain comfort and confidence with where I am in my life, but also brought me myriad other benefits. I have no idea where this journey will take me, or how long the writing + recording will continue. For now, I am still really enjoying it! Above all, I’m so thankful for anyone here with me on this journey. I appreciate your support, the feedback you provide, and wish you all the best. Be not afeared! 🙏

Click the image to check out the podcast episode!

How time flies! Reflections on a two-year milestone

Two years ago today I drove to work and walked into my office for the last time. Shortly thereafter, I briefly met with someone in HR, turned in my company ID and laptop, and exited the building, no longer an employee. I’d performed this routine a number of times before at other companies, but this was the first time I’d done so with no new job lined up. I was unemployed – forever, perhaps, leaving my 23-year biotech career behind. This was indeed intentional, as I’d achieved my financial independence (FI) target a year prior, and was now “retiring” early (RE) – starting the next phase of my life. I had no idea what was going to come next but I was really excited about it!

One more year?

As I recently wrote all about, I’ve done a lot in the two years since that day. Taking inventory of what I’ve tried, learned, accomplished, and enjoyed, was a really valuable exercise. I’ve certainly felt busy very often, and looking at that list after writing it reinforced to me why that was the case! This time I’ve had, while often strange, has been incredibly valuable to me. As we recently discussed on an as-yet unaired episode of Two Side of FI, I wouldn’t trade anything for all that I’ve gained by deciding to take this path.

In that conversation, my show partner and great friend Eric asked me a question posed by one of our viewers:

“Knowing what you know now, would you have worked an extra 1-2 years that would allow you to build up additional buffer, such that some of the tougher decisions you’re making now (and stress that goes along with it) would be less of an issue or not at all.”

The spirit of the question was financial in nature, but I spoke to it more broadly. I’ve not yet watched the video recording, so I don’t know precisely how I answered. But I certainly recall the spirit of it as it’s easy: absolutely not. Sure, by continuing to work and banking another year of savings, mathematically one can only feel more secure. In doing so, you’d have more funds in your portfolio, additional cash reserves, etc. Perhaps you could use some of that money to buy something fun for yourself – maybe an RV, like so many retirees enjoy. That’s certainly a possibility too. However, that would have meant trading away my experiences over the last two years. And I’m unwilling to do that.

731 days of learning

Sure, I know what some may be thinking: trips could have been put off to a future date, coursework could have been undertaken at another time, and so on. But many if not most things would surely be different as a result. We can’t merely “cut and paste” the chapters of our lives as if we were writing a document in Microsoft Word. How can I look at the experiences I’ve enjoyed, time with family and friends, the memories I’ve made, and say “sure, if I could rewind the clock I’d do it all differently”, and elect to work another year or two? It’s unfathomable to me.

I’m so incredibly thankful for the experiences I’ve had and the memories I’ve made over these past two years. I’ve learned much along the way, most of it about myself. This time to reflect, and I believe, grow – greatly concentrated due to COVID-19 lockdowns and a lot of time spent at home, has been priceless. All retirees surely must go through this period of introspection and searching given the magnitude and suddenness of this life change. I don’t mean to say that I’m special in this way. Rather, I’m merely noting how much I have valued this time that I’ve had to think hard about my nearly 49 years on this planet, my successes, failures, and everything in between. Not to say that I have it all worked out – far from it! I’m merely getting started, I think, but every journey begins somewhere.

I’ve done and learned a lot in these past two years. In some ways it was very much as expected, but there have been so many more ways in which I was surprised (more on that here). I’m truly enjoying this opportunity to explore new interests, to learn, and grow. If I knew a genie, I wouldn’t choose to change my path to this day. I am truly grateful for the experiences I have had, and for this time with my family. I feel very fortunate and am thankful for all that I have. Here’s to whatever the next two years brings!

I wish you all the best in all things. Thanks for being with me on this journey. 🙏

The value of taking inventory: a 20-month checkpoint

First, sorry to have been away so long! I see that it’s been two months since my last post – my longest writing gap so far. To be honest, I just haven’t had topics about which I wanted to write, such that I was willing to take time away from other things on my plate. That changed today while on a walk with my wife, Lorri.

If you’ve worked in retail, manufacturing, or in a whole host of other trades, you understand the value of taking inventory. One of the key lessons I’ve learned since leaving the workplace more than 1.5 years ago is that this applies to our personal lives as well. What do I mean? I’ve found there is tremendous value in taking time to reflect, allocating the mental space needed to think about what you’ve been up to, your accomplishments, lessons learned, etc. I didn’t do a very good job of that -and often enough during my career, but this blog has been a big part of me changing that.

Some time after I wrote an article reflecting on my first year in early “retirement”, I decided I wasn’t going to write another milestone post until my two year mark. Sitting here penning this piece, I realize that I’ve changed my mind. Today marks 628 days since my last day at my last job in biotech, just over 20 months or 1.75 years ago. Most days, that phase of my life seems really far away, but on occasion it feels rather near. The former makes good sense to me as I feel like, despite the challenges that came with COVID-19, I’ve done a lot since embarking on this next chapter in my life. And so I thought it would be a fun exercise to take inventory of those things here.


So what have I been up to? I don’t know if I can top the pace of my first six weeks post-FIRE, but I feel like I’ve done a lot. While not an exhaustive list, in no particular order, I have…

  • Started Two Sides of FI, a YouTube channel and podcast, with my good friend of 35 years, Eric. As I write this, we’ve released 29 full-length episodes as well as many highlight videos and Shorts, which have been viewed nearly 700 thousand times, and we have nearly 13,000 subscribers to the channel. Wow! I’m so proud of this project and remain humbled that people value the content we produce. This has been the most fulfilling aspect of my FIRE journey so far, without exception.
  • Learned* video and audio production and editing. The asterisk denotes that this learning is very much ongoing. But I feel like I now know just enough to be dangerous re: Final Cut Pro, Garage Band, and the processes needed to put out video and audio content.
  • Completed three iOS app development courses and wrote a few apps. I spent a good chunk of the first 4+ months after moving to this effort, and really enjoyed it. I completely threw myself into this and had planned to do so even before leaving my job. I’ve not done much with this lately but who knows? I may pick it up again.
  • Qualified as a FAA-certified Part 107 commercial drone pilot. Last year I bought a drone and wasn’t entirely sure of where that would take me. But since the videos were going to be used on YouTube and I had some interest in other commercial uses, getting the license was the right path. Will it ever go beyond simple hobby use? Who knows?
  • Volunteered at my local COVID-19 vaccine clinic. One of my post-FIRE aims was always to do more service. Due to COVID and other more selfish reasons, I haven’t done really well on this aim – yet. But I did enjoy taking a weekly shift at the town clinic during the big vaccination push in those early months after shots were available.
  • Worked part-time at a local winery tasting room. I never saw this coming but my love of wine, enjoyment of education, and need for socialization made a once-weekly tasting room job a great fit. I’m still doing this nearly a year later with a really great group of people, and I truly enjoy it – as well as the industry discounts! 🍷
  • Given two talks and career counseling to students. I had the honor to be invited to speak to two groups of undergraduate + graduate students about careers in biotechnology and my own path. Since then I’ve had a number of career counseling calls with students. I get a ton out of these and wonder if it may turn into something I want to do more with.
  • Took the longest vacation of my life – 5 weeks! Like many, we didn’t get to see family and friends for over a year due to COVID-19. It was wonderful to get such a long time to travel with my wife and daughter, seeing so many people we missed. This kind of trip, along with some shorter road trips, simply couldn’t have happened were I still working full-time.
  • Found a great online community in the FIRE Discord server. I’ve been a fan of online chat since the earliest days of the internet. But I didn’t realize the value I’d find in socializing with a group of like-minded FIRE folks such as this great group has provided me. Talking about FIRE can be tricky so forums like this are a wonderful thing to have.
  • Taken several online classes. Outside of the iOS coursework, I’ve taken classes in topics including financial markets, personal finance, and most recently world history (admittedly we’ve been a little delinquent on this last one lately). I love learning and look forward to taking some classes at our local community college or university in the future!
  • Started a homebrewing club with Lorri. Making connections with people and socializing is important. The combination of moving to a new town, not having a “day job”, and COVID made both things tough. It’s been great to combine our love of beer and brewing with the opportunity to meet people. We’re a few months in now and it’s going really great.
  • Done a ton of cooking and learned new cuisines. I managed to make all seven of the Oaxacan moles (my recipe database is here), which was an extension of a long-standing bucket list item to make mole negro. Eventually I moved on to Indian cuisine, which was a really fun change-up. I’m still cooking nearly all the family’s meals at this point and it’s something I truly enjoy.
  • Taken hundreds of walks and hikes. I’ve taken a walk nearly every day since I stopped working, and most weeks I also take a longer hike with Lorri. This has been great for so many reasons: when solo, I listen to books or podcasts, or simply take time to reflect. When my wife and I walk/hike together, it’s great phone-free time to just catch up, talk about future plans, and enjoy quiet time together. I can’t imagine not having this in my life now!
  • Read many more books than I had in years. While I’ve always been a reader, admittedly the pace of completing books slowed a lot for me as my career advanced. I’ve now completely turned that around and between audiobooks, ebooks, and the paper kind, I get through tons more these days. It’s also wonderful having a library just a short walk from home!


I’m sure I neglected to add many things to this list. And it’s probably way too long so I do wonder who will even read it. But even so, it’s been really rewarding to sit, think, and write this piece. A few thoughts come to mind: While I now have way more “free time” than ever in my adult life, I’ve never been bored (I get asked this a lot). Rather, like many early “retirees”, I don’t know if I’ve ever been busier. The difference is that now with rare exception, the day is full of the things I/we want to do, and not things at someone else’s direction. But this list does at least help me appreciate why I always feel like I’ve got plenty that I want to do!

Looking at the list, it’s a mix of things I’d planned to do since before I stopped working, along with quite a few I just stumbled into – the YouTube channel is a great example of that. There was absolutely no plan to do that and yet it’s become my biggest time expenditure post-FIRE, as well as the most rewarding part of each week. And this is the benefit of this chapter of my life. I now have the freedom to wander around, trying things, and seeing what sticks. And like with iOS coding, I can simply set things down after trying them – temporarily or perhaps permanently. Who cares?

As I’ve written many times here before, I know just how fortunate I am to be where I find myself. I remain thankful for all of you who read these pieces, sharing your own experiences with me as you follow my journey. I wish you all the best in whatever you aim to achieve.
Mahalo. 🙏