Content creation: my surprise glidepath into early retirement

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My good friend and Two Sides of FI show partner, Eric and I recently had the honor of being interviewed by a well known FIRE community member – Jordan “Doc G” Grumet. The image at the bottom of this post links to that episode of the Earn and Invest podcast. It was a great conversation and I hope you check it out. Having the chance to speak with Jordan was a really positive experience for me in a variety of ways. First, it was a privilege to work with a great interviewer and respected member of this community, and have a really enjoyable conversation with him and Eric. Second, it felt like a kind of acknowledgement that our little project had reached another stage in its evolution. This chat represents the first time that we were the guest on someone else’s platform as Two Sides of FI, and I’m excited for the exposure that this could bring to our little show. Lastly, the experience caused me to reflect on a number of key topics. And one of those seemed an important theme to write about.

Transitions can be challenging

One concept that has come up numerous times on the YouTube channel is the idea of glidepaths into retirement. Often in the FIRE community these relate to finances, like certain asset allocation strategies. But what’s perhaps even more important, are those that have nothing to do with money. Retirement, whether early or traditional, is a huge change for anyone. Irrespective of how long your career was and how happy you were in those jobs, ceasing to do the thing you spent the majority of your waking hours doing for nearly the entirety of your adult life up until that point is a big transition. Even if retirement is something you looked forward to and planned for years, it’s a substantial and often rather abrupt course change. It’s even harder for someone who unexpectedly had to retire.

As I’ve talked about here before, the timing of my own transition could perhaps have been better. I stopped working at my former job in June 2020, just a couple of months into the COVID-19 lockdown. That meant that I was spending a lot more time at home, indoors, very much focused on my new life, often alone with my thoughts. I kept busy, throwing myself into many pursuits – learning, exercise, cooking – just to name a few. Six months ago I made an effort to take inventory of all these things. And the list has continued to grow since! But while fulfilling and fun, these undertakings were not what has most helped me process this life change, and the countless emotions that came with it. Rather, it’s been the unintentional glidepath I stumbled into via content creation.

Surprise! You’re a content creator

As I talked about with Jordan, have written about here, and discussed with Eric on the channel, these creative outlets have truly supported my transition into this next chapter of my life. I don’t want you to think that was some kind of super intelligent plan I had from the start. In my very first blog post I acknowledged that I wasn’t even sure why I was writing! The YouTube channel seemed like a fun idea from the very first time we discussed it, and I certainly looked forward to building new skills as part of that journey. But I didn’t realize just how important these endeavors would be to me in more fundamental ways.

It’s interesting to me how these two projects have served related, but differing purposes. This blog turned out to be so much about processing the emotions I was feeling but didn’t yet understand after leaving my career. I can certainly pick up on that when I revisit my earliest posts. Admittedly, the blog has never found a huge audience and I didn’t exactly go out of my way to promote it nor undertake any SEO to lead others to it. So it has largely been a personal, reflective tool – though I truly appreciate all of you who are here with me, reading. But countless times, simply following the wandering path of writing has helped me understand + work through things I’m feeling. Importantly, some posts have caused me to initiate conversations with my family about how I’ve been feeling, and make needed changes. That’s pretty valuable stuff, to say the least.

Two Sides of FI picked up where writing left off, and has expanded in purpose even further. Unquestionably, I’ve always found value in the chats themselves. It’s been so helpful to have open exchange with a trusted friend who I know will speak the candid truth and help me work through questions. I know Eric finds value in our conversations too and it feels great when I feel like I’m able to help in any way. And as we talked about on E+I, it’s been wonderful to have our now 36-year friendship enter a new stage in its evolution. I wouldn’t trade that for anything. But what I couldn’t have foreseen is how truly validating this experience would be. I wrote all about that idea nearly a year ago. Building and working with our channel’s community has been really rewarding. The exchanges I have help me in many ways, and it feels good to know others appreciate + learn from what we create too. It has definitely helped me grow and understand my own journey that much more.

Adding hyphens to your identity

I spent the entirety of my 23-year career and in my training years prior, identifying as a scientist. While the second half of my career was spent primarily out of the lab, or no longer overseeing teams of lab scientists, it always felt like “who I was”. To that, I could have added other words and hypens, like scientist-product manager-service leader-and so on… And of course I’m also a husband, a parent, a son, among other things. However these days, I’ve become much more comfortable with my identity being much more fluid, and frankly, far less important to define so rigidly. I’m no longer merely a scientist, or any of the other labels I used throughout my career. Now I’m a content creator: a writer, podcaster, a YouTuber, an occasional wine educator, and someone who thinks + talks about retirement, personal finance, and the universe of associated topics often.

The last two years have taught me a lot of things. Some of them I come to on my own, while others were born out of conversations had on 2SFI or in the E+I podcast linked here. What I do know is that content creation has most certainly aided my transition into this next phase of my life. I have become increasingly comfortable with the idea of “being retired” from my former career (no matter what “the R word” actually means!) It has not only helped me gain comfort and confidence with where I am in my life, but also brought me myriad other benefits. I have no idea where this journey will take me, or how long the writing + recording will continue. For now, I am still really enjoying it! Above all, I’m so thankful for anyone here with me on this journey. I appreciate your support, the feedback you provide, and wish you all the best. Be not afeared! 🙏

Click the image to check out the podcast episode!

4 Replies to “Content creation: my surprise glidepath into early retirement”

  1. More good stuff, Jason! I’m always able to find a nugget or five in the things you share, and also the things you and Eric talk about on 2SFI.
    Change has not always necessarily been an easy thing for me, I but I guess in retrospect I’ve definitely gotten better with it over time. Sometimes change chooses us, and sometimes we choose it. Hearing you share your journey helps by giving yet another perspective on things. Congratulations on your continued positive navigation of things post FI. Thanks for sharing, and keep up the great content creation!

    1. Thanks, Grant! So glad you liked it. Changes are ever certain, aren’t they? Thanks for your support and best wishes to you on your own journey.

  2. I’m really glad I stumbled onto your and Eric’s podcast last year Jason; I too always find them useful and enjoyable listening to your conversations. I also enjoy your posts here, and watching from the sidelines as you further transition into your RE journey. I hopefully will join you in that regard within the next 12 – 24 months!

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