The value of taking inventory: a 20-month checkpoint

First, sorry to have been away so long! I see that it’s been two months since my last post – my longest writing gap so far. To be honest, I just haven’t had topics about which I wanted to write, such that I was willing to take time away from other things on my plate. That changed today while on a walk with my wife, Lorri.

If you’ve worked in retail, manufacturing, or in a whole host of other trades, you understand the value of taking inventory. One of the key lessons I’ve learned since leaving the workplace more than 1.5 years ago is that this applies to our personal lives as well. What do I mean? I’ve found there is tremendous value in taking time to reflect, allocating the mental space needed to think about what you’ve been up to, your accomplishments, lessons learned, etc. I didn’t do a very good job of that -and often enough during my career, but this blog has been a big part of me changing that.

Some time after I wrote an article reflecting on my first year in early “retirement”, I decided I wasn’t going to write another milestone post until my two year mark. Sitting here penning this piece, I realize that I’ve changed my mind. Today marks 628 days since my last day at my last job in biotech, just over 20 months or 1.75 years ago. Most days, that phase of my life seems really far away, but on occasion it feels rather near. The former makes good sense to me as I feel like, despite the challenges that came with COVID-19, I’ve done a lot since embarking on this next chapter in my life. And so I thought it would be a fun exercise to take inventory of those things here.


So what have I been up to? I don’t know if I can top the pace of my first six weeks post-FIRE, but I feel like I’ve done a lot. While not an exhaustive list, in no particular order, I have…

  • Started Two Sides of FI, a YouTube channel and podcast, with my good friend of 35 years, Eric. As I write this, we’ve released 29 full-length episodes as well as many highlight videos and Shorts, which have been viewed nearly 700 thousand times, and we have nearly 13,000 subscribers to the channel. Wow! I’m so proud of this project and remain humbled that people value the content we produce. This has been the most fulfilling aspect of my FIRE journey so far, without exception.
  • Learned* video and audio production and editing. The asterisk denotes that this learning is very much ongoing. But I feel like I now know just enough to be dangerous re: Final Cut Pro, Garage Band, and the processes needed to put out video and audio content.
  • Completed three iOS app development courses and wrote a few apps. I spent a good chunk of the first 4+ months after moving to this effort, and really enjoyed it. I completely threw myself into this and had planned to do so even before leaving my job. I’ve not done much with this lately but who knows? I may pick it up again.
  • Qualified as a FAA-certified Part 107 commercial drone pilot. Last year I bought a drone and wasn’t entirely sure of where that would take me. But since the videos were going to be used on YouTube and I had some interest in other commercial uses, getting the license was the right path. Will it ever go beyond simple hobby use? Who knows?
  • Volunteered at my local COVID-19 vaccine clinic. One of my post-FIRE aims was always to do more service. Due to COVID and other more selfish reasons, I haven’t done really well on this aim – yet. But I did enjoy taking a weekly shift at the town clinic during the big vaccination push in those early months after shots were available.
  • Worked part-time at a local winery tasting room. I never saw this coming but my love of wine, enjoyment of education, and need for socialization made a once-weekly tasting room job a great fit. I’m still doing this nearly a year later with a really great group of people, and I truly enjoy it – as well as the industry discounts! 🍷
  • Given two talks and career counseling to students. I had the honor to be invited to speak to two groups of undergraduate + graduate students about careers in biotechnology and my own path. Since then I’ve had a number of career counseling calls with students. I get a ton out of these and wonder if it may turn into something I want to do more with.
  • Took the longest vacation of my life – 5 weeks! Like many, we didn’t get to see family and friends for over a year due to COVID-19. It was wonderful to get such a long time to travel with my wife and daughter, seeing so many people we missed. This kind of trip, along with some shorter road trips, simply couldn’t have happened were I still working full-time.
  • Found a great online community in the FIRE Discord server. I’ve been a fan of online chat since the earliest days of the internet. But I didn’t realize the value I’d find in socializing with a group of like-minded FIRE folks such as this great group has provided me. Talking about FIRE can be tricky so forums like this are a wonderful thing to have.
  • Taken several online classes. Outside of the iOS coursework, I’ve taken classes in topics including financial markets, personal finance, and most recently world history (admittedly we’ve been a little delinquent on this last one lately). I love learning and look forward to taking some classes at our local community college or university in the future!
  • Started a homebrewing club with Lorri. Making connections with people and socializing is important. The combination of moving to a new town, not having a “day job”, and COVID made both things tough. It’s been great to combine our love of beer and brewing with the opportunity to meet people. We’re a few months in now and it’s going really great.
  • Done a ton of cooking and learned new cuisines. I managed to make all seven of the Oaxacan moles (my recipe database is here), which was an extension of a long-standing bucket list item to make mole negro. Eventually I moved on to Indian cuisine, which was a really fun change-up. I’m still cooking nearly all the family’s meals at this point and it’s something I truly enjoy.
  • Taken hundreds of walks and hikes. I’ve taken a walk nearly every day since I stopped working, and most weeks I also take a longer hike with Lorri. This has been great for so many reasons: when solo, I listen to books or podcasts, or simply take time to reflect. When my wife and I walk/hike together, it’s great phone-free time to just catch up, talk about future plans, and enjoy quiet time together. I can’t imagine not having this in my life now!
  • Read many more books than I had in years. While I’ve always been a reader, admittedly the pace of completing books slowed a lot for me as my career advanced. I’ve now completely turned that around and between audiobooks, ebooks, and the paper kind, I get through tons more these days. It’s also wonderful having a library just a short walk from home!


I’m sure I neglected to add many things to this list. And it’s probably way too long so I do wonder who will even read it. But even so, it’s been really rewarding to sit, think, and write this piece. A few thoughts come to mind: While I now have way more “free time” than ever in my adult life, I’ve never been bored (I get asked this a lot). Rather, like many early “retirees”, I don’t know if I’ve ever been busier. The difference is that now with rare exception, the day is full of the things I/we want to do, and not things at someone else’s direction. But this list does at least help me appreciate why I always feel like I’ve got plenty that I want to do!

Looking at the list, it’s a mix of things I’d planned to do since before I stopped working, along with quite a few I just stumbled into – the YouTube channel is a great example of that. There was absolutely no plan to do that and yet it’s become my biggest time expenditure post-FIRE, as well as the most rewarding part of each week. And this is the benefit of this chapter of my life. I now have the freedom to wander around, trying things, and seeing what sticks. And like with iOS coding, I can simply set things down after trying them – temporarily or perhaps permanently. Who cares?

As I’ve written many times here before, I know just how fortunate I am to be where I find myself. I remain thankful for all of you who read these pieces, sharing your own experiences with me as you follow my journey. I wish you all the best in whatever you aim to achieve.
Mahalo. 🙏

Excelsior!

I’m originally from New York State and as such, I know the state motto: “Excelsior”. The translation of this from Latin is generally stated as “Ever upward”. I can hardly think of a better sentiment to share at the end of 2021, another challenging year for everyone. I’ve been quiet of late on this blog and I wanted to ensure I didn’t let the end of the year pass without writing at least a short post.

First, I’m doing well, and I hope you are too. As I write this, it’s now been just over 1.5 years since I left my career behind. I remain incredibly grateful and excited about all the opportunity ahead of me and for all the “possible futures” (a term I am borrowing from my Two Sides of FI show partner) that may come. Despite the challenges we all know, my family and I have made many nice memories throughout the year. Barring a few colds that have run their courses, we’ve remained healthy, and we are very thankful for this. Thanks are due to all who worked tirelessly to produce COVID vaccines, diagnostic tests, and who have endeavored in so many ways to keep us all safe and healthy.

I’ve decided not to write another milestone post until at least my two year mark. But to briefly summarize a few happenings from the last six months:

  • Our YouTube audience has grown a lot and we’ve now published 23 full-length episodes
  • We took a five-week long trip to visit family and friends we’d not seen in well over a year
  • Lorri and I started a (beer) homebrewing club in our town, and it’s coming along nicely!
  • I found a great online community in the FIRE Discord server
  • I have started to explore a new podcast + book idea (stay tuned!)

I’ve been a bit less regular about this blog of late and as I’ve mentioned before, it’s hard for me to predict what will come for it. I’m often inspired to write about what I’m thinking, and I’m happy to do so as I have good ideas. But given the energy the YouTube channel is taking – and I’m loving every minute of it! – it’s not too surprising that I don’t want to write as often or on my former weekly cadence. I remain appreciative that anyone wants to read my thoughts and I’m grateful for all the feedback I’ve received over the past 1.5 years.

Above all, I wish you the very happiest of holiday seasons, and for a healthy, productive, and rewarding year to come. I do hope that your own paths remain “ever upward” in their trajectories, and that 2022 (and beyond) brings you fulfillment of your own goals and dreams. Excelsior!

image credit: Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

Choosing FIRE: considering the top regrets of the dying

I came across this image in a Reddit post earlier today, after which I found this article in The Guardian. My initial response was to share the picture on social media and then with my friends on the FIRE Discord server. Why the latter? Because I was sure it would resonate with them. Contrary to one popular dismissal of the financial independence/retire early path, most don’t elect FIRE because “they hate working”. Rather, achieving FI enables a means to live life the way one chooses, including the option to stop working if and when they want. In other words, to reduce or eliminate the requirement to spend the majority of one’s waking hours working instead of doing other things of interest.

I fear that I can’t add much wisdom to the profoundly important words written above. If nothing else, I thought it would be a good opportunity for me to reflect on how my FIRE journey is very much related to several points contained within. Above all, I hope in sharing this that it might cause you to consider whether you are making the best choices you can to honor your inner needs and desires, avoiding later regrets. To repurpose something I usually say in another context, the best time to start doing so is yesterday, and the second best time is today.

I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me

I’ve never felt pressure from family to achieve X, nor was I told that only path Y was the “right one” for me. I know this isn’t the case for everyone, and I’m truly thankful that I’ve not experienced this. As such, I’ve felt comfortable living the life I wanted to live as an adult. But I have certainly had my choices challenged by former colleagues or friends at times, particularly when it came to job changes. Most often they had good intentions and believed they were supplying me good career advice. But I was on a different path and the difficulty was that I didn’t feel comfortable explaining that until the very end of my career. Quite honestly, I wasn’t very courageous about describing my path and the rationale for it, and that created challenges.

I didn’t always know about FIRE but I did know early in my career that I wanted to retire early. I also didn’t know how I’d achieve that early on. I didn’t magically come to my career “leveling up” strategy. Rather, it evolved through several early moves in my career and seeing the benefit of the same. I realized that by building breadth in skills, and not fearing moves into new companies and stretching beyond my comfort zone, that I could accelerate my path. Importantly, my wife always supported me in this despite the challenges it meant for our family. We believed in the end goal we were seeking. While my path was not the traditional one, I’m not sure that it was courageous. But I can say that I’ve tried to honor what I knew in my heart I wanted to do. And here I am!

I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

I really like this point and yet I’m of two minds on it. First, the obvious one: By achieving FI at age 46, I eliminated the requirement to work until traditional retirement age. I therefore created the option to stop working so hard, and I took advantage of that just over a year later when I left the workplace. So conceivably, I have been largely successful in avoiding having this regret. Right? Mostly.

In my case, electing this path meant a series of tradeoffs were made along the way. Part of my journey included several roles at start up companies, meaning very long hours spent at work and therefore away from home. It also meant frequent jobs changes and associated moves away from family and friends. In the second half of my career, the roles I had involved extensive travel, which meant more time away from my wife and daughter. All of these had impact on my family and meant that I wasn’t always there for specific events, or at times in my daughter’s early years, just to name a few. Were those the “right” decisions? My wife and I accepted them with eyes open and as a team. But they had a cost.

To be clear, I’m not complaining. Yes, I worked hard. But many people work just as long or longer hours, do harder/manual labor, do it for many more years than I did, and are compensated far less for their efforts. On net, I believe the choices I made were the best for my family and so I do not regret them. But it’s worth reflecting on what it took to get here and be doubly appreciative for what I have now. I am very thankful that I no longer need to work so hard.

I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.

Me being me, this one warrants a whole post unto itself. But I’ll be brief in the moment. Suffice it to say, I don’t usually shy away from my feelings. One of my favorite things about my FIRE journey is that I now feel the freedom to share more openly about it. Don’t be mistaken – I still hold back at times, as my Two Sides of FI show partner is correct in reminding me. But through this blog and our YouTube channel, I’ve become more comfortable with openly sharing my feelings (to an increasingly larger audience!). That’s been really good for me and I hope that it helps others as well. At times, I admit that all my corporate training still wins out, and I choose my words more carefully than I should, muting the emotions underlying the point I’m making. But i’m improving and I feel strongly that having the freedom that FIRE has provided is helping – in all things, not just in content creation. And I’m really happy about that.

I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

Generally speaking, I think I’ve done a good job with avoiding this regret. I’m a pretty nostalgic person and enjoying keeping in touch with friends made through the years. That said, leaving the workplace and my prior and subsequent moves have created physical distance between me and my friends. True, I now have the time to travel more frequently to see them. Since leaving the workplace, I have taken several opportunities to visit out of state friends, which wouldn’t have happened were I still working. And this has been hugely positive for me. Not having a work calendar and a vacation days allotment is so freeing.

On the other hand, as we’ve discussed on the YouTube channel, FIRE does have a way of creating distractions if not challenges to friendships. Not everyone sees the validity in this path and may have difficulty talking about it. Honestly, it’s hard when you don’t feel comfortable discussing something so important to you with close friends because of how they react to it. I’ve certainly not worked through this yet but it is something I think about a lot. I do need to write more about this, if nothing else. I’ve got more to process here, and it’s important. This is one area in which FIRE path folks need to be prepared. I want to remain close to my friends irrespective of my path, assuming they’re willing.

I wish that I had let myself be happier.

We can’t control everything in life. Misfortunes and hardships may come at any time. That said, it is often spoken that we choose how we react to these things. I will freely admit I did not always choose happiness. While working, I often let many things get to me, compete for my time, and challenge my wellbeing. Like many, the ever-present cellphone became a real difficulty for me. The text messages and emails from customers and colleagues were never ending, and I found these impossible to ignore. This certainly affected my mood at times as my family will attest. Naturally I could have done more to deal with this, and I’m surely not saying FIRE is the only solution! But electing to follow this path has been an important part of me deliberately choosing happiness over stress.

The important point to make here is that I am very happy and I am increasingly choosing to be so via this path. I know how fortunate I am to have achieved what I have, and I remind myself of that often. I am truly grateful that my wife and I get to choose our path forward from here. Are our options limitless? No. We don’t have a Fort Knox-like stash of gold to fund an insanely lavish lifestyle. But we do have the freedom to live well without the requirement to work – and that’s huge! We are in good health, are relatively young, and have many options available to us. It is now on us to create the life we wish to live from here on out, for the remaining years we are vertical on this planet. It is overwhelming in some respects but we absolutely look forward to the challenge of determining what to do to maintain and grow our happiness in our life together!


Will I have regrets as my life nears its end? I have no idea. Like most people, there are things that I wish had happened differently; that I had made better choices or avoided hurting others by my actions or via neglect. I am far from perfect and I can’t change that. I do know one thing: I think it highly unlikely that I’ll regret my decision to follow a FIRE path. I wish you life devoid of regrets and full of happiness. Mahalo. ?

image credit: Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash