Be not afeard! Embrace change

This post may contain affiliate links and we may earn a small commission for purchases made through the same, at no added cost to you. Please read more about our policies. Thank you.

This post is part two in a series about factors I have found best enable success in the workplace. Click here to see the others in the series.

Be not afeard. The isle is full of noises,
Sounds, and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not.

The Tempest; Act III, Scene II by William Shakespeare

Introduction

When I reflect upon my own career, I find that the times where I learned the most are those in which I took bold steps. By that I mean when opportunities for large changes presented themselves – by my seeking them out or when they just landed in my lap, I elected to accept them. I do not mean to say that one should be hasty and leap at everything presented to you. However, when considering the balance of being risk averse vs. moving ahead with confidence, I have found that erring towards the latter is the most productive and has provided the greatest growth opportunities for me.

My experience has demonstrated that the keys to enabling success are: never stop learning, align yourself with great mentors, embrace change, work hard, and leverage your strengths. To these I always add good fortune / luck, since like it or not, it has a role to play.

Embracing change accelerates your personal growth

I have worked at several start up biotech companies during my career. One of these comes to mind when considering this topic. I was in my fifth year at a mid-sized division of a large multinational corporation considering what my next career step might be. I was successful at this company but felt my pace of growth was slowing. I knew a couple of people at a very stealthy startup just a few miles away, and one made me aware of a job posting. The role was in product management, the same as my current position. I interviewed for that job and after several discussions, I was offered a completely different role at the company! This position would be to build and lead a customer service and support organization – something I had never done before. What to do?

I had good adjacent experience – I knew the field in which the company operated, I had some direct customer interaction from product management, and had handled escalated support cases while in R&D. But for sure, I didn’t know the ins and outs of how to put together and lead this kind of organization. After some consideration, I decided to take the plunge. Why? For starters, I assumed these obviously intelligent and successful people wouldn’t have offered me the job had they not believed me capable. I also knew I would learn a lot doing something I had never done before – experience had taught me this. Additionally, the few people I knew at this small company were confident in the technology (about which I knew nothing until my first day of work!) – so that didn’t seem too risky. Lastly, as my wife reminded me, should this job not work out, there wouldn’t really be a downside. If it didn’t work out I could find a new job when it was time to go. There were other opportunities around and I had about thirteen years of good work experience by that point. So I went for it!

What was the outcome? In short, I learned more in the five years I was at that company than any other role in my career, without question. I took part in growing a company from a small, pre-launch startup to one with hundreds of employees, went through two acquisitions, helped establish and maintain a customer base of thousands, and facilitated a blistering pace of revenue growth. I learned how to build and lead a large global support organization (which came in handy in a future role), and how to be a better people leader. Being part of the company leadership team gave me exposure to numerous mentors from whom I learned a tremendous amount – more on the role of mentors in a future installment in this series! This role also taught me more about dealing with adversity and difficult situations than any other in my career. Importantly, I had the opportunity to work with hundreds of tremendously talented colleagues and customers, growing both my network and my knowledge substantially.

A case for staying put?

Should you always leap at what is put before you? Of course not. Consideration is warranted for any big decisions. If your current role and company is providing you great opportunities for growth and you feel strongly that “seeing it through” for a longer period makes good sense, it may be a great option at present. Balancing opportunity cost is certainly part of the equation when contemplating change. But I would recommend to always be evaluating if that calculus has changed.

On the other hand, I have had numerous colleagues who were unhappy in their role or at their company, and had been so for years. They were talented and well connected, so opportunities came their way. They often had little to no barriers to making a change, which is not always the case. However, they never budged for fear of change, electing to stay with what they knew, warts and all! That sounds like a pretty miserable way to spend the majority of your waking hours, doesn’t it? It is more common than you may realize, in my experience. If you aren’t growing, aren’t happy, and see opportunities to turn that around, I would assert that there is no time like the present to do that! There is also peril in staying put and waiting for “unicorn” jobs, those perfect opportunities that might come along once in a lifetime. As many have said in various ways, “perfect is the enemy of good enough”!

Conclusion

Considering my example, would I have continued to grow had I stayed at my previous company? Almost certainly. I had a good role there, was well regarded, and had opportunities at other parts of the larger corporation. However, I assert that my development was greatly accelerated by the choice I made to leave, setting aside the more comfortable or “safe” path and embracing the big change presented to me. Was it all sunshine and roses? Of course not – but what is in life? We grow the most when we stretch ourselves, and challenging times can provide the greatest catalyst for that growth. In summary, embracing change is a huge enabler of growth and my own experience suggests that if you align yourself with good people, use these opportunities to learn, and work hard, success will follow. What has your own experience been?

photo credit: Change by Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0 Alpha Stock Images

Please Leave a Comment!