How time flies! Reflections on a two-year milestone

Two years ago today I drove to work and walked into my office for the last time. Shortly thereafter, I briefly met with someone in HR, turned in my company ID and laptop, and exited the building, no longer an employee. I’d performed this routine a number of times before at other companies, but this was the first time I’d done so with no new job lined up. I was unemployed – forever, perhaps, leaving my 23-year biotech career behind. This was indeed intentional, as I’d achieved my financial independence (FI) target a year prior, and was now “retiring” early (RE) – starting the next phase of my life. I had no idea what was going to come next but I was really excited about it!

One more year?

As I recently wrote all about, I’ve done a lot in the two years since that day. Taking inventory of what I’ve tried, learned, accomplished, and enjoyed, was a really valuable exercise. I’ve certainly felt busy very often, and looking at that list after writing it reinforced to me why that was the case! This time I’ve had, while often strange, has been incredibly valuable to me. As we recently discussed on an as-yet unaired episode of Two Side of FI, I wouldn’t trade anything for all that I’ve gained by deciding to take this path.

In that conversation, my show partner and great friend Eric asked me a question posed by one of our viewers:

“Knowing what you know now, would you have worked an extra 1-2 years that would allow you to build up additional buffer, such that some of the tougher decisions you’re making now (and stress that goes along with it) would be less of an issue or not at all.”

The spirit of the question was financial in nature, but I spoke to it more broadly. I’ve not yet watched the video recording, so I don’t know precisely how I answered. But I certainly recall the spirit of it as it’s easy: absolutely not. Sure, by continuing to work and banking another year of savings, mathematically one can only feel more secure. In doing so, you’d have more funds in your portfolio, additional cash reserves, etc. Perhaps you could use some of that money to buy something fun for yourself – maybe an RV, like so many retirees enjoy. That’s certainly a possibility too. However, that would have meant trading away my experiences over the last two years. And I’m unwilling to do that.

731 days of learning

Sure, I know what some may be thinking: trips could have been put off to a future date, coursework could have been undertaken at another time, and so on. But many if not most things would surely be different as a result. We can’t merely “cut and paste” the chapters of our lives as if we were writing a document in Microsoft Word. How can I look at the experiences I’ve enjoyed, time with family and friends, the memories I’ve made, and say “sure, if I could rewind the clock I’d do it all differently”, and elect to work another year or two? It’s unfathomable to me.

I’m so incredibly thankful for the experiences I’ve had and the memories I’ve made over these past two years. I’ve learned much along the way, most of it about myself. This time to reflect, and I believe, grow – greatly concentrated due to COVID-19 lockdowns and a lot of time spent at home, has been priceless. All retirees surely must go through this period of introspection and searching given the magnitude and suddenness of this life change. I don’t mean to say that I’m special in this way. Rather, I’m merely noting how much I have valued this time that I’ve had to think hard about my nearly 49 years on this planet, my successes, failures, and everything in between. Not to say that I have it all worked out – far from it! I’m merely getting started, I think, but every journey begins somewhere.

I’ve done and learned a lot in these past two years. In some ways it was very much as expected, but there have been so many more ways in which I was surprised (more on that here). I’m truly enjoying this opportunity to explore new interests, to learn, and grow. If I knew a genie, I wouldn’t choose to change my path to this day. I am truly grateful for the experiences I have had, and for this time with my family. I feel very fortunate and am thankful for all that I have. Here’s to whatever the next two years brings!

I wish you all the best in all things. Thanks for being with me on this journey. 🙏